postcard

postcard

My Missing Countries

My Missing Countries
djibouti . gabon . nauru . somalia . yemen

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Mammals


ADDAX.  (Addax nasomaculatus), also known as the white antelope and the screwhorn antelope, is an antelope of the genus Addax, that lives in the Sahara desert. It was first described by Henri de Blainville in 1816. As suggested by its alternative name, this pale antelope has long, twisted horns. Read more about addax HERE.











INDIAN WILD ASS.  The Indian wild ass, as with most other Asian wild ass subspecies, is quite different from the African wild ass species. The coat is usually sandy, but varies from reddish grey, fawn, to pale chestnut. The animal possesses an erect, dark mane which runs from the back of the head and along the neck. The mane is then followed by a dark brown stripe running along the back, to the root of the tail.  Read more about Indian wild ass HERE.





LITTLE BROWN BAT.  The little brown bat (sometimes called little brown myotis) (Myotis lucifugus) is a species of the genus Myotis (mouse-eared bats), one of the most common bats of North America. The little brown bat has been a model organism for studying bats.  Read more about little brown bat HERE.


ASIAN BLACK BEAR.  The Asian black bear (Ursus thibetanus) is also known as moon bear and white-chested bear. It is a medium-sized bear species and largely adapted to arboreal life. It is found in the Himalayas, in the northern parts of the Indian Subcontinent, Korea, northeastern China, the Russian far east, the Honshū and Shikoku islands of Japan and Taiwan. Read more about asian black bear HERE.


BROWN BEAR (Ursus arctos) is a large bear with the widest distribution of any living ursid. The species is distributed across much of northern Eurasia and North America. It is one of the two largest terrestrial carnivorans alive today, rivaled in body size only by its close cousin, the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), which is much less variable in size and averages larger due to this. There are several recognized subspecies, many of which are quite well-known within their native ranges, found in the brown bear species.

SUN BEAR. The sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) is a bear found in tropical forest habitats of Southeast Asia. It is classified as Vulnerable by IUCN as the large-scale deforestation that has occurred throughout Southeast Asia over the past three decades has dramatically reduced suitable habitat for the sun bear.  Read more about sun bear HERE.


USSURI BROWN BEAR
.  The Ussuri brown bear (Ursus arctos lasiotus), also known as the black grizzly is a subspecies of the brown bear found in the Ussuri krai, Sakhalin, the Amur Oblast, northward to the Shantar Islands, Iturup Island, northeastern China, the Korean peninsula, Hokkaidō and Kunashiri Island. It is very similar to the Kamchatka brown bear, though it has a more elongated skull, a less elevated forehead, somewhat longer nasal bones and less separated zygomatic arches, and is somewhat darker in color, with some individuals being completely black.  Read more about Ussuri black bear HERE.









INDIAN BISON. The gaur (/ˈɡaʊər/, Bos gaurus), also called Indian bison, is the largest extant bovine and is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia. The species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List since 1986, as the population decline in parts of the species' range is likely to be well over 70% during the last three generations. Population trends are stable in well-protected areas, and are rebuilding in a few areas which had been neglected. Read more about Indian bison HERE.







The blue duiker (Philantomba monticola) is a small, forest-dwelling duiker found in the Central Africa and southern South Africa.
Blue duikers stand around 35 cm (14 in) tall at the shoulder and weigh 4 kg (8.8 lb). They are among the smallest species in the antelope family.
Read more about blue duiker HERE.










LOWLAND MIDGET BUFFALO also known as anoa, midget buffalo and sapiutan, are a subgenus of Bubalus comprising two species native to Indonesia: the mountain anoa (Bubalus quarlesi) and the lowland anoa(Bubalus depressicornis). Both live in undisturbed rainforest, and are essentially miniature water buffalo. They are similar in appearance to a deer, weighing 150–300 kg (330–660 lb).
Both are found on the island of Sulawesi and the nearby island of Buton in Indonesia. They apparently live singly or in pairs, rather than in herds like most cattle, except when the cows are about to give birth. One young is born per year.
Both species of anoa have been classified as endangered since the 1960s, and the population continues to decrease. Fewer than 5000 animals of each species likely remain. Reasons for their decline include hunting for hide, horns, and meat by the local peoples and loss of habitat due to the advancement of settlement. Currently, hunting is the more serious factor in most areas. Read more about lowland midget buffalo HERE.


CAPYBARA.  The capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) is a large rodent of genus Hydrochoerus of which the only other member is the lesser capybara (Hydrochoerus isthnius).  The capybara is the largest rodent in the world.  Close relativs are guinea pigs and rock cavies.  Native to South America, it is a highly social species and can be found in groups as large as 100 individuals, but usually lives in groups of 10-20 individuals.  Read more about capybara HERE.


AMUR LEOPARD.  It is classified as Critically Endangered since 1996 by IUCN. Only 14–20 adults and 5–6 cubs were counted in a census in 2007, with a total of 19–26 Amur leopards extant in the wild.   The Amur leopard is also known as the Far Eastern leopard.  Read more about amur leopard HERE.



CLOUDED LEOPARD.  Many of the remaining forest areas are too small to ensure the long-term persistence of clouded leopard populations. They are threatened by habitat loss following large–scale deforestation and commercial poaching for the wildlife trade. Skins, claws, and teeth are offered for decoration and clothing, bones and meat as substitute for tiger in traditional Asian medicines and tonics, and live animals for the pet trade. Few poaching incidents have been documented, but all range states are believed to have some degree of commercial poaching.   Read more about clouded leopard HERE.  Listen to a clouded leopard calls HERE.


PERSIAN LEOPARD.  Leopards were most likely distributed once over the whole Caucasus, except for steppe areas. Surveys conducted between 2001 and 2005 confirmed that there are no more leopards in the western part of the Greater Caucasus, and that they survived only at a few sites in the eastern part. The largest populations survive in Iran. The political and social changes in the former Soviet Union in 1992 caused a severe economic crisis and a weakening of formerly effective protection systems. Ranges of all wildlife were severely fragmented. Read more about persian leopard HERE.


FISHING CAT.  The fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized wild cat of South and Southeast Asia. In 2008, the IUCN classified the fishing cat as Endangered since they are concentrated primarily in wetland habitats, which are increasingly being settled, degraded and converted. Over the last decade, the fishing cat population throughout much of its Asian range declined severely.  Read more about fishing cat HERE.


PALLA'S CAT (Otocolobus manul), also called the manul, is a small wild cat with a broad but fragmented distribution in the grasslands and montane steppes of Central Asia. It is negatively affected by habitat degradation, prey base decline, and hunting, and has therefore been classified as Near Threatened by IUCN since 2002.  Read more about Palla's cat HERE.


SERVAL. The serval (Leptailurus serval) is a medium-sized African wild cat. DNA studies have shown that the serval is closely related to the African golden cat and the caracal. Read more about serval HERE.



WILD CAT.  The wildcat (Felis silvestris) is a small cat found throughout most of Africa, Europe, and southwest and central Asia into India, China, and Mongolia. Because of its wide range it is classed by the IUCN as Least Concern. However, crossbreeding with housecats is extensive and has occurred throughout almost the entirety of the species' range, potentially threatening the genetic diversity of the wild subspecies.  Read more about wildcat HERE.







SOUTH AMERICAN COATI or ring-tailed coati (Nasua nasua), is a species of coati from tropical and subtropical South America. In Brazilian Portuguese it is known as quati. First discovered by the explorer Sir Brian Doll in the late 1800s, while mapping an uncharted section of Brazilian rainforest.  Read more about South American coati HERE.













BAWEAN DEER. also known as Kuhl's hog deer or Bawean hog deer, is a highly threatened species of deer found only in the island of Bawean (Gresik Regency) in Indonesia. Read more about Bawean deer HERE.



DINGO.  Dingoes are reasonably abundant in large parts of Australia, but there is some argument that they are endangered due to interbreeding with other dogs in many parts of their range. Dingoes are not a protected species, but they are regulated under federal law and, thus, their status varies in different states and territories. Read more about dingo HERE.

AMAZON RIVER DOLPHIN or pink river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, is a freshwater river dolphin endemic to the Orinoco, Amazon and Araguaia/Tocantins River systems of Brazil, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. It was previously listed as a vulnerable species by the IUCN due to pollution, overfishing, excessive boat traffic, and habitat loss, but in 2011 it was changed to data deficient due to a lack of current information about threats, ecology, and population numbers and trends.  Read more about Amazon River dolphin HERE.





COMMON ELAND. (Taurotragus oryx), also known as the southern eland or eland antelope, is a savannah and plains antelope found in East and Southern Africa. It is a species of the family Bovidae and genus Taurotragus. It was first described by Peter Simon Pallas in 1766.  Read more about common eland HERE.




ISLAND FLYING FOX.  The small flying fox, island flying fox or variable flying fox (Pteropus hypomelanus) is a species of flying fox in the Pteropodidae family. It is found in Australia, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Maldives, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.  Read more about island flying fox HERE.


WHITE WINGED FLYING FOX.  The white-winged flying fox (Desmalopex leucopterus), also known as the Mottle-winged flying fox is a species of bat in the Pteropodidae family. It is endemic to the Philippines. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.  Read more about white winged flying fox HERE.




BAT-EARED FOX. (Otocyon megalotis) is a species of fox found on the African savanna, named for its large ears, which are used for thermoregulation. Fossil records show this canid first appeared during the middle Pleistocene, about 800,000 years ago.





INDIAN GAZELLE.  The chinkara, also called Indian gazelle, is a gazelle species native to Iran, Pakistan and India. In 2001, the Indian chinkara population was estimated at 100,000 with 80,000 living in the Thar Desert. The population in Pakistan is scattered, and has been severely reduced by hunting. Also in Iran, the population is fragmented. In Afghanistan, chinkaras are probably very rare.   Read more about Indian gazelle HERE






2016 Giant Panda Update : Status - Vulnerable [READ MORE]


HOOLOCK GIBBON.  The Hoolock gibbons, are two primate species of genus Hoolock in the gibbon family, Hylobatidae, native to eastern Bangladesh, Northeast India and Southwest China.  Read more about hoolock gibbon HERE.


LAR GIBBON.  The lar gibbon (Hylobates lar), also known as the white-handed gibbon, is a primate in the gibbon family, Hylobatidae. It is one of the better-known gibbons and is often seen in zoos.  Read more about lar gibbon HERE.










AFRICAN PYGMY  HEDGEHOG. It is smaller than the European hedgehog, and thus is sometimes called African pygmy hedgehog.



COMMON HIPPOPOTAMUS Hippopotamus amphibius), or hippo, is a large, mostly herbivorous mammal in sub-Saharan Africa, and one of only two extant species in the family Hippopotamidae, the other being the pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis or Hexaprotodon liberiensis). The name comes from the ancient Greek for "river horse". After the elephant and rhinoceros, the common hippopotamus is the third-largest type of land mammal and the heaviest extant artiodactyl.The common hippopotamus is semiaquatic, inhabiting rivers, lakes and mangrove swamps, where territorial bulls preside over a stretch of river and groups of five to thirty females and young. During the day, they remain cool by staying in the water or mud; reproduction and childbirth both occur in water. They emerge at dusk to graze on grasses. While hippopotamuses rest near each other in the water, grazing is a solitary activity and hippos are not territorial  on land. Read more HERE.









BLACK BACKED JACKAL (Canis mesomelas) is a canid native to two areas of Africa, separated by roughly 900 km.Compared to other members of the genus Canis, the black-backed jackal is a very ancient species, and has changed little since the Pleistocene, being the most basal  canine alongside the closely related side-striped jackal. It is a fox-like canid with a reddish coat and a black saddle that extends from the shoulders to the base of the tail. It is a monogamous animal, whose young may remain with the family to help raise new generations of pups. The black-backed jackal is not a fussy eater, and feeds on small to medium-sized animals, as well as plant matter and human refuse. Read more about back backed jackal HERE.






KOALA.  The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus, or, inaccurately, koala bear[a]) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae, and its closest living relatives are the wombats.  Read more about koala HERE.






BOOTED MACAQUE (Macaca ochreata) is a macaque of the Sulawesi Island, Indonesia. This Old World monkey is diurnal and spends most of the day in the trees. It is 50–59 cm long plus a tail of 35–40 cm. Read more about booted macaque HERE.


INDIAN GRAY MONGOOSE.  The Indian grey mongoose or common grey mongoose (Herpestes edwardsii) is a species of mongoose mainly found in southern Asia, in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka and some other parts of Asia.  Read more about Indian gray mongoose HERE.




BALD UAKARI. (Cacajao calvus) or bald-headed uakari is a small New World monkey characterized by a very short tail; bright, crimson face; a bald head; and long coat. The bald uakari is restricted to várzea forests and other wooded habitats near water in the western Amazon of Brazil and Peru.


COTTON-TOP TAMARIN. (Saguinus oedipus) is a small New World monkey weighing less than 0.5 kg (1.1 lb). One of the smallest primates, the cotton-top tamarin is easily recognized by the long, white sagittal crest extending from its forehead to its shoulders. The species is found in tropical forest edges and secondary forests in northwestern Colombia, where it is arboreal and diurnal. Its diet includes insects and plant exudates, and it is an important seed disperser in the tropical ecosystem.

DUSKY LEAF MONKEY.  The dusky leaf monkey, spectacled langur, or spectacled leaf monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus) is a species of primate in the Cercopithecidae family. It is found in Malaysia, Burma, and Thailand.  Read more about dusky leaf monkey HERE.


GEOFFROY'S SPIDER MONKEY Geoffroy's spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi), also known as black-handed spider monkey, is a species of spider monkey, a type of New World monkey, from Central America, parts of Mexico and possibly a small portion of Colombia. There are at least five subspecies. Some primatologists classify the black-headed spider monkey (A. fusciceps), found in Panama, Colombia, and Ecuador as the same species as Geoffroy's spider monkey. Read more about Geoffroy's spider monkey HERE.


GUATEMALAN BLACK HOWLER, or Yucatan black howler, (Alouatta pigra) is a species of howler monkey, a type of New World monkey, from Central America. It is found in Belize, Guatemala and Mexico, in and near the Yucatan Peninsula. It lives in evergreen, semideciduous and lowland rain forests.  Read more about the Guatemalan black howler monkey HERE.



GOLDEN MONKEY


GRAY LANGUR.  Gray langurs or Hanuman langurs, the most widespread langurs of South Asia, are a group of Old World monkeys constituting the entirety of the genus Semnopithecus.  Read more about gray langur HERE.


MAROON LEAF MONKEYmaroon languror red leaf monkey (Presbytis rubicunda) is a species of primate in the family Cercopithecidae. It is found on the southeast Asian island of Borneo and the nearby smaller Karimata.


RED-SHANKED DUOC (Pygathrix nemaeus) is a species of Old World monkey, among the most colourful of all primates. This monkey is sometimes called the "costumed ape" for its extravagant appearance. From its knees to its ankles it sports maroon-red "stockings", and it appears to wear white forearm length gloves. Its attire is finished with black hands and feet. The golden face is framed by a white ruff, which is considerably fluffier in males. The eyelids are a soft powder blue. The tail is white with a triangle of white hair at the base. Males of all ages have a white spot on both sides of the corners of the rump patch, and red and white genitals. Read more about  red-shaned duoc HERE.



TUFTED CAPUCHIN. (Cebus apella), also known as brown capuchin, black-capped capuchin, or pin monkey is a New World primate from South America. As traditionally defined, it is one of the most widespread primates in the Neotropics. It is an omnivorous animal, mostly feeding on fruits and invertebrates, although it sometimes feeds on small vertebrates (e.g. lizards and bird chicks) and other plant parts. Read more about tufted capuchin HERE.


LION-TAILED MACAQUEH (Macaca silenus), or the wanderoo, is an Old World monkey endemic to the Western Ghats of South India. The hair of the lion-tailed macaque is black. Its outstanding characteristic is the silver-white mane which surrounds the head from the cheeks down to its chin, which gives this monkey its German name Bartaffe - "beard ape". The hairless face is black in colour. Read more about lion-tailed macaque HERE.





LESSER MOUSE-DEER It is the smallest known hoofed mammal, its mature size being as little as 45 cm (18 inches) and 2 kg (4.4 lb). It is threatened by predation by feral dogs. It is found widely across Southeast Asia in Indochina, Burma (isthmus of Kra), Brunei, Cambodia, China (S Yunnan), Indonesia (Kalimantan, Sumatra and many small islands), Laos, Malaysia (peninsular Malaya, Sarawak and many small islands), Singapore, Thailand , and Vietnam.







NYALA.  The nyala (Nyala angasii or Tragelaphus angasii), also called inyala, is a spiral-horned antelope native to southern Africa. The nyala is mainly active in the early morning and the late afternoon. It generally browses during the day if temperatures are 20–30 °C (68–86 °F) and during the night in rainy season. As a herbivore, the nyala feeds upon foliage, fruits and grasses, with sufficient fresh water. A shy animal, it prefers water holes rather than open spaces. Read more about nyala HERE.



EUROPEAN OTTER (Lutra lutra), also known as the Eurasian otterEurasian river otter,common otter and Old World otter, is a European and Asian member of the Lutrinae or otter subfamily, and is typical of freshwater otters.


GIANT RIVER OTTER(Pteronura brasiliensis) is a South American carnivorous mammal. It is the longest member of the Mustelidae, or weasel family, a globally successful group of predators, reaching up to 1.7 m (5.6 ft). Atypical of mustelids, the giant otter is a social species, with family groups typically supporting three to eight members. The groups are centered on a dominant breeding pair and are extremely cohesive and cooperative. Although generally peaceful, the species is territorial, and aggression has been observed between groups. The giant otter is diurnal, being active exclusively during daylight hours. It is the noisiest otter species, and distinct vocalizations have been documented that indicate alarm, aggressiveness, and reassurance. Read more HERE.




INDIAN PANGOLIN. The Indian pangolin, thick-tailed pangolin, or scaly anteater (Manis crassicaudata) is a pangolin found in the plains and hills of India, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan. It is not common anywhere in its range. Like other pangolins, it has large, overlapping scales on its body which act as armour. It can also curl itself into a ball as self-defence against predators such as the tiger. The colour of its scales varies depending on the colour of the earth in its surroundings. It is an insectivore that feeds on ants and termites, digging them out of mounds and logs using its long claws, which are as long as its fore limbs. It is nocturnal and rests in deep burrows during the day. Read more about Indian pangolin HERE.











PHILIPPINE PORCUPINE.  The Philippine porcupine, Indonesian porcupine, or Palawan porcupine, Hystrix pumila, is a species of rodent in the Hystricidae family (Old World porcupines) endemic to the island of Palawan in the Philippines. It is known locally as durian or landak.  Read more about Philippine porcupine HERE.








TURKESTAN RAT.  The Turkestan rat (Rattus pyctoris) is a species of rodent in the family Muridae. It is found in Afghanistan, China, India, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, and Pakistan.








INDIAN RHINOCEROS. The Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis), also called the greater one-horned rhinoceros and Indian one-horned rhinoceros, belongs to the family Rhinocerotidae. Listed as a vulnerable species, the large mammal is primarily found in north-eastern India's Assam and in protected areas in the Terai of Nepal, where populations are confined to the riverine grasslands in the foothills of the Himalayas. Read more about Indian rhinoceros HERE.



CRESTED PORCUPINE.  The crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) is a species of rodent in the Hystricidae family. It is extant in mainland Italy, Sicily, North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa. Almost the entire body is covered with bristles which are either dark brown or black and rather coarse. This mammal is recognizable by the quills that run along the head, nape, and back that can be raised into a crest. Hence the name crested porcupine.  Read more about crested porcupine HERE.




RUSSIAN DESMAN.  The Russian desman (Desmana moschata) (Russian: выхухоль) is a small semiaquatic mammal that inhabits the Volga, Don and Ural River basins in Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. It constructs burrows into the banks of ponds and slow-moving streams, but prefers small, overgrown ponds with abundance of insects, crayfish and amphibians. The Russian desman often lives in small (usually not related) groups of two to five animals, and appears to have a complex (but largely unstudied) communication and social system.  Read more about Russian desman HERE.







SAIMAA RINGED SEAL 
(Pusa hispida saimensis) is a subspecies of ringed seal (Pusa hispida). They are among the most endangered seals in the world, having a total population of only about 320 individuals. The only existing population of these seals is found in Lake Saimaa, Finland(hence the name). The population is descended from ringed seals that were separated from the rest when the land rose after the last ice age. This seal, along with the Ladoga seal and the Baikal seal, is one of the few living freshwater seals. Read more about Saimaa ringed seal HERE.


















SUGAR GLIDERS (Petaurus breviceps) are characterised by their gliding membrane, known as the patagium, which extends from their forelegs to hindlegs. Gliding serves as an efficient means of both reaching food and evading predators. They are covered in soft, pale grey to brown fur, which is lighter in colour on their underside. Read more about sugar gliders HERE.



SOUTH AMERICAN TAPIR. (Tapirus terrestris), Brazilian tapir (from the Tupi tapi'ira), lowland tapir or (in Portuguese) anta, is one of five species in the tapir family. It is dark brown, paler in the face, and has a low, erect crest running from the crown down the back of the neck. The round, dark ears have distinctive white edges.  Read more about South American tapir HERE.


HORSFIELD'S TARSIER.   (Cephalopachus bancanus), also known as the western tarsier, is the only species of tarsier in the genus Cephalopachus. It occurs on Borneo, Sumatra and nearby islands and is, like other members of the group, entirely nocturnal.  Read more about Horsfield's tarsier HERE.












WATERBUCK (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) is a large antelope found widely in sub-Saharan Africa. It is placed in the genus Kobus of the family Bovidae. It was first described by Irish naturalist William Ogilby in 1833. The thirteen subspecies are grouped under two varieties: the common or ellipsen waterbuck and the defassa waterbuck. Read more about waterbuck HERE.










WILD BOAR. The wild boar (Sus scrofa), also known as the wild swine or Eurasian wild pig is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its range further, thus making the species one of the widest ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform. Its wide range, high numbers and adaptability mean that it is classed as least concern by the IUCN. The animal probably originated in South-East Asia during the Early Pleistocene, and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World. Read more about wild boar HERE.


MANED WOLF. (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is the largest canid of South America. Its markings resemble those of foxes, but it is not a fox, nor is it a wolf, as it is not closely related to other canids. It is the only species in the genus Chrysocyon (meaning "golden dog"). Read more about maned wolf HERE.


MEXICAN WOLF.  The Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi), also known as the lobo, is a subspecies of gray wolf native to the Sierra Madre and the surrounding area of western Mexico, though its range once included the southeastern United States. It is the smallest of North America's gray wolves. Read more about Mexican wolf HERE.


RED WOLF.  In 2007, the US Fish and Wildlife Service estimated that there were 300 red wolves remaining in the world, with 207 of those in captivity.  In 1991, two pairs were reintroduced into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, where the last known red wolf was killed in 1905.  Despite some early success, the wolves were relocated to North Carolina in 1998, ending the effort to reintroduce the species to the Park.  Read more about red wolf HERE.







No comments: